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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> couric: tonight, rebels in libya beat back attempts by the army to retake lost territory. the u.s. steps up the pressure on cadmy to quit, but he's still not giving up. i'm katie couric. also tonight, deep trouble in the midwest. heavy rain and melting snow adds up to flooding that's sweeping through hundreds of homes. are teachers taking a lesson from the labor dispute in wisconsin? a union leader is giving some ground on the red-hot issue of tenure. and the american spirit. an artist who brings to life a world his eyes cannot see. from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. moammar qaddafi's latest offensive was a colossal failure and tonight he's more isolated than ever. troops loyal to qaddafi tried to retake three cities overnight but they were repelled by rebel forces. today in one of those cities, zawiyah, there were celebrations in the streets. the people are firmly in charge and demanding qaddafi go. secretary of state hillary clinton warned that unless he does, libya is at risk of a lo
. but defense secretary gates said they would be used in libya only for emergency evacuations or to deliver relief supplies. he raised a host of reservations about military intervention. no authorization from either the u.n. or nato, reluctance to tie up force which is might be needed in afghanistan, concerns about fanning anti-american sentiment in the rest of the arab world. >> we also have to think about, frankly, the use of the u.s. military in another country in the middle east. >> reporter: gates said he was unable to gauge the rebels' chances of overthrowing qaddafi. >> it remains to be seen how effectively military leaders who have defected from qaddafi's forces can organize the opposition in the country. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton ticked off future scenarios for libya, and two out of three were bad. >> libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war or it could descend into chaos. >> reporter: the u.s. and britain are openly talking about setting up a no-fly zone over libya. >> it is not acceptable to have a situation where colonel qaddafi
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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